Why a Pre-K class at Liberty?

Liberty Christian's main mission is to partner with parents in providing a Christian education for their child.  Currently, most children attend school before the required Kindergarten age.  We strive to make it convenient for parents to be able to start their child in Pre-K at Liberty which creates a congruent educational base and a smooth transition into Kindergarten.  By attending Pre-K at Liberty, we find the students to be much more prepared for our strong academic program than if they attend a preschool elsewhere.  

 

Who may attend Pre-K at Liberty?

Liberty's Pre-K class is open to children who are four years of age (by September 1) and older.  Some exceptions may be made for younger children, but a meeting and evaluation by the administration will need to be conducted.  Because our Pre-K tends to be more academic than other preschools, we find that children younger than four years old have a harder time adapting to the classroom structure.  If your child is younger than four years old but you would still like them attend the Pre-K class, please contact the office.

 

What type of curriculum is used for the Pre-K program?

Liberty strives to keep the curriculum cohesive throughout their entire time at the school, thus the A Beka Book Kindergarten Age 4 curriculum program is used.  This program combines the essential, age appropriate play, games and activities along with the essential academic learning that will prepare them for Kindergarten.

In Pre-K, they will learn:

  • Their vowels and consonants along with the short and long sounds.
  • To sound one- and two-vowel words phonetically along with combining them with a consonant
  • To read short sentences and stories
  • To capitalize the first word of a sentence, and place a period at the end.
  •  Good writing posture, proper pencil hold, and slanted paper position
  • Correct letter placement and formation
  • To write their first name
  • To write 26 lowercase letters and 12 capital letters
  • To write blends and one-vowel words
  • To memorize 22 poems, 4 finger plays, and 12 nursery rhymes including actions and motions
  • To gain confidence performing in front of an audience
  • Increased comprehension through questions that encourage listening and thinking skills
  • Vocabulary enrichment such as understanding and producing rhyming words and opposite words
  • The building blocks of learning numbers through object counting
  • Recognize numbers and concepts 1–20
  • Observation, listening, and motor skills through counting sounds and counting while clapping, jumping, hopping
  • To count by ones to 100
  • Add 1 to 1–9 using concrete objects
  • Recognize shapes: circle, square, rectangle, triangle

For a full overview of the Pre-K curriculum, please use link below:

 

What day and time options are available for Pre-K students?

We provide a variety of options for our Pre-K students.  Students may attend our 3 day a week or 5 day a week program.  The 3 day a week program is held on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays.  Both programs start at 8:30am.

Both the 3 day and 5 day programs also have the option of attending a half or full school day.  The half day students will be released at noon, while the full day students will join the Kindergarten classroom for their afternoon studies and will be released at 3:00pm.

 

What is the dress code for Pre-K?

One of the fundamental purposes of school is to provide the foundation for developing a proper attitude toward education.  In order to implement this, it is essential to create and maintain an effective teaching learning environment.  Student attire impacts the teaching and learning environment.  It can either promote a more effective educational environment, or it can disrupt the educational climate and process.  Student attire that is acceptable for some social settings may not be acceptable for the educational environment of school.  Liberty Christian School’s dress code is not designed to be a defining statement of right and wrong.  We realize that each family will have various ideas on what type of apparel or appearance would be appropriate.  We are not seeking to make a judgment on a family’s view of what is appropriate. 

 Our dress code is based on the biblical principles of modesty, neatness, and appropriateness. Modesty is mentioned often as an important character quality. (I Cor. 6:19-20, I Tim. 2:9, I Peter 3:3-4) Modest people don’t go out of their way to bring undue attention to themselves. Likewise, neatness and appropriateness are important as we seek to be ambassadors for Jesus Christ. We need to be examples for the believers in speech, in life, in love, in faith, in purity. We also desire to give a good report and not be offensive in anything we do. (Col. 4:5) This suggests living differently than the world. (Titus 3:1-8) In addition, dress is to be distinctively masculine and feminine, reflecting a wholesome appreciation for God’s plan (Deut. 22:5)  As we determine to glorify the Lord in all we do, these qualities help us to do that in the area of dress.  God values people and relationships above clothing and outward appearance.  (I Sam. 16:7)
 

It is also important to realize that parents, as the primary educators of their children (Deuteronomy 6; Ephesians 6), play a key role in this area of dress code. It is incumbent upon parents to guide and supervise their children in the selection of appropriate clothing. Accordingly, this dress code is intended to make known in as clear a way as possible the position, guidelines, and restrictions of Liberty Christian School in the area of dress.

Faculty members have the prerogative of asking students to change their attire if they feel the student is dressed in an inappropriate manner.  Administration has the final say on all dress code policies. 

Please view full details outlined in the Parent Handbook below.

What are the class sizes for Pre-K?

Our Pre-K classes typically range from five to twelve students.  We like to keep the class numbers small to insure that each child is given the best experience at whatever level they enter our program.

 

How do I know if my child is ready for Pre-K?

Great question!  This is just one of the many tough decisions that parents face in the early years of their child's life.  The decision of when (or if) to send your child to preschool is one to think and pray about.  Since schooling isn't required in Washington until Kindergarten, it is sometimes challenging to know the "right" time to enroll your child.  Since there is no one-size-fits-all checklist, we have given you a few suggestions below to help you in deciding if your child is ready for pre-k here at Liberty. 

To start, your child must be at least 4 years of age by Sept. 1 of that school year. (exceptions apply)  If your child is on the younger side, some of these tips may be helpful when deciding to put them in preschool this year or next.  

Readiness Signs:

  • Child is not overly anxious about leaving you
  • Child is okay with moderate to high levels of stimulation
  •  Child should also be able to take care of basic needs, like washing his hands after painting and eating without assistance. 
  • Is able to concentrate and focus on an individual task
  • Is ready for group activities such as "circle time"
  • Has the physical stamina to handle moving from one activity to another, playing at recess, doing art projects, and to focus on academics 

How can I help get my child ready to enter Pre-K?

  • Work on building anticipation rather than anxiety.  Introduce them to the idea of preschool because when children know what to expect, they feel more secure.
  • In the year leading up to preschool, visit the classroom.  It is best if children can see the classroom and meet the teacher.
  • Get your child to have a positive attitude about preschool by talking to them about what it is like - what they will do, the friends they will meet, and how fun it will be.
  • Let your child help you get things ready!  Let them help pack their backpack and choose a snack.
  • Start pointing out letters and numbers on streets and buildings, and shapes and colors in architecture.  The more you talk to and read to your child, the more vocabulary they are learning.
  • Help your child to become more self-sufficient by teaching them how to do things such as; brush their own hair, put on their own pants, button buttons and zip zippers.  Self-confidence is key.  If they know how to do some things on their own, they will feel accomplished, confident and comfortable going into this big new world.